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Desperate for job


FromDurbs

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FromDurbs

We moved to Melbourne at the end of last year.  I came with a job, love it and make enough money that we can pay the bills.

My husband has been desperately looking and is having no luck.  All applications come back unsuccessful.  What do you do?  He is a trained (and very good) psychologist and has some experience working in a shop.  He is not registered as psychologist in Australia and wont be for a while.  He is willing to do anything, but is basically unskilled and unexperienced at everything other than doing counseling and therapy.  What now?  It is not so much the money, but he worked with people and hates being alone at home all day.  Even volunteering is not working out.  There are long application processes everywhere and you are basically put on a waiting list of volunteers.  Does anyone know of a nice volunteering position?  That will take you soon?  Or any jobs?  I really dont know what to do. 

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monsta

This situation happens a lot... it happened to family friends. She is a Brit and her husband is american. Hubby had a very specialized job... took him a year to find a job here. It really sucked for them.

 

If you were in Sydney I could help a bit more, I am not based in Melbourne. You could try volunteer at your local church? It may be on a Sunday, but at least it will make hubby feel useful. It would also help him build up his "volunteering CV".

 

I work in a warehouse, we occasionally get people applying who are "waiting for their real job". The issue for the warehouse manager is those staff members will leave in a few months, just when they are fully trained up and hitting their groove. so, he generally turns them down. Hubby might have a bit more luck applying as a casual. Those are jobs where they don't expect you to hang around for a year... but they will only be part time and some weeks you might get lots of shifts and other weeks not so many. The shift work may also be on the weekend. They also won't give you the same responsibility level that permanent staff get. So, all the "slightly more skilled" jobs that need doing will go to the permanent staff.

 

I have seen Spot Jobs advertising casual jobs...  https://www.spotjobs.com/   I can't tell you if they are any good.

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Have you thought about uber?

 

My wife was in a similarish position, she ended up doing a bit of part time work and volunteering at the Salvos or Sacred Heart Op Shop. It was one of the quickest volunteer positions she could get and gave her something to do during the day.

 

Good luck.

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Mara

@FromDurbs I think most odd jobs will have a waiting list. Melbourne is huge, so perhaps if you change your signature to state which suburb you live in, then you may get more assistance in this instance.

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@Duggen Sadly Uber requires you to have had a Victorian licence for 12 months before you can drive for them.

 

@FromDurbs What about Bunnings and Coles? They have room for casuals who have certain skills or prior experience in retail at different levels. And I believe they have certain roles aimed at the short term casual labour market too!

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RYLC

And I can't help but wonder whether he is missing the great big elephant in the room..... migration is hard in many ways.  As a psychologist he has the skills to put together a "course" or course of action for people in the same boat, to facilitate a meet up group for others in the same situation, to use his skills on himself in finding meaning in his current circumstances.  I vote that he start a meet up group for fellow "job orphans".  It will give all of them places to go, people to see, purpose etc.  A smart move might be to ask at the library whether they provide rooms for free meetings (our libraries in Adelaide do) and them he'll make himself known to people there. They might even advertise his meeting in their local publications and of course his information will be on the meetup website.  Our council offers a volunteer counselling service and starting his own meet up may get him the door of that too. Each step is a step towards a job through relationships and word of mouth. Remember too to update his Linkedin profile with the meetup details. www.meetup.com

Edited by RYLC
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RYLC

My other suggestion is to go and study something (a short course) at Tafe evening classes. There he'll find other working people, they have the shared experience of studying, working on assignments together etc. You never know who he may meet.  I got a job through these evening classes because I helped a much older lady with our assignment and months later she remembered me and how helpful I was, contacted me on Facebook and the job was mine. No interview or anything.

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RYLC

And lastly: do you have kids because there are usually plenty of volunteer opportunities at your kids' school if they are in primary school.  Otherwise he could attend the P&F meetings to become more involved with the school and help out at sports day etc.

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RedPanda

I understand how it feels. I'm currently doing casual work at a legal firm, and taking an independent course on PV array installation. But finding the first job is hard, and sitting at home is also quite tough. It sounds wrong to say that, but it is. Everything I've learnt about Australia so far indicates that your husband will not be able to work as a psychologist until he is registered with the relevant authority? So perhaps getting the Plan of Action set up for that asap is a good idea. And then just keep at it, look for anything you can help with locally, like RYLC said try the school.

But definitely, good luck and 'sterkte'!!!

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FromDurbs

Thanks everyone.  Really appreciate all your input.  I realise my response will sound as if I dont.  But we have tried a lot of what is being suggested.

He applied everywhere, coles, bunnings, woolworths, KFC etc.  I dont think an old man in an entry level position is very appealing to a recruiter.  Who would you take?  The 20 year old or the 47 year old?  So, we have tried that.  He applied for temp and casual agencies, no reply.  They did say they assign jobs based on how long you have been listed with them, so maybe something might still come up given time.  

Kids are older, secondary school.  He applied to volunteer at the school and was told they dont need anyone.   Attending ALL meetings at the school.  They tend to go through the agenda and then disperse, so not much socialising.  But it helps. 

One volunteer program came back to him and asked that he officially apply.  If accepted they want him to go through a 4 month training program, one session per month, before he can do anything.  So that is at least 4 months away.  

We are attending a church, who just started a men's group, and it has been an absolute blessing.

He is helping out at a local hobby group.  They even asked him to run the event twice, which was nice.  

Love the study something idea.  The TAFE evening classes idea.  

There seem to be some delivery and driver jobs out there.  But I dont think that would help much, other than bringing in money?  Sitting alone in your own car is not much different from sitting alone at home?  Or am I missing something. 

I also completely take Monsta's point about looking like someone looking for something till the 'real' job comes.  That might be the whole problem.  Maybe he should relook his CV and make it clear that he is looking for a career change.  Very good advice.

About the elephant in the room:  we have been thinking along those lines.  It helps to hear other people think it is a viable idea.

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MerlinZA

Hi FromDurbs

 

I am the FC at a franchise network of psychologists. 

 

I know they're always looking for subcontractors at our various locations. PM me your husbands resume and i will pass it onto our Network Performance team and maybe they can assist

 

thanks

 

 

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Mara

@MerlinZA what a good guy you are... appreciated!

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@FromDurbs

It may be worthwhile to look into getting a coaching qualification, whilst waiting for the registration. I work with a number of psychologists who also do leadership/ executive coaching, which is a growing trend globally.

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RYLC
On 5/16/2017 at 5:25 PM, RYLC said:

 

And I can't help but wonder whether he is missing the great big elephant in the room..... migration is hard in many ways.  As a psychologist he has the skills to put together a "course" or course of action for people in the same boat,

 

 

I've been thinking some more about the fact that your husband has such unique skills and insight into the migration process and people REALLY struggle with the transition.  Have a read of this thread below and let him have a think about how he could package / facilitate / workshop / workbook some processes etc to get through migration.  Basically something along the lines of creating meaning and purpose in a new life while processing the grief and bewilderment of the new circumstances.  His contribution is needed in this world of migration.

 

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TeeTMI

Just sent you a PM with a potential volunteer option, I can provide an introduction if of interest?

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RedPanda

If it's an option for him, for sure! go for migration counselling. I am not aware of therapists that specialise in this area and I think it's sorely needed. It's such a massive event that encompasses so many aspects, I think it's really hard for someone to understand if they haven't gone through it themselves. This would be a service I'd advocate for far and wide. 

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  • 2 weeks later...
Riekie

Another option is to volunteer at a detention center or with refugees. 

 

How long until he would be registered to practice in Australia?

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TeeTMI

I noticed in the Age newspaper this weekend that there were a number of schools currently advertising for:

 

Psychologist / Student Counsellor / Director of Wellbeing positions

Sounded as if many did not require psychologist AHPRA registration as such

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  • 2 months later...

Hi @FromDurbs,

 

I hope your husband has found something that he is happy with.

I wondered if I may ask you about his journey.

 

A friend of mine is thinking about moving to over. He won't need a skills assessment for a Visa but would obviously like to register and work. I've seen on some other threads that many South African psychologists could not pass the skills assessment. Is your husband South African trained and do you have any info on AHPRA registration process for psychologists that you are happy to share?

 

(I'm also struggling with AHPRA registration, but in another profession, seems like earliest Jan 2018 if I'm lucky...)

 

 

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RedPanda

I have recently spoken to @FromDurbs, they do have a good update to make, but I will leave it up to them how much they want to tell. (But perseverance paid off in the end)

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Yep, we were pretty much in the same situation. My husband struggled to find work in his field (water management engineering), firstly due to lack of Australian experience, his age (60) etc, etc. In 2,5 years he applied for perhaps hundreds of positions, and ended up doing a customer service job a my company. He finally found work in his field 1,5 years after we arrived, only to be retrenched soon after. Experience and niche qualifications count for nothing here. He volunteered as soccer coach for a university and got involved in the club soccer scene, and that kept him sane, plus he made useful contacts. 

 

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SimpleSimon

@FromDurbs unfortunately you've got to look at what the employment market needs. Currently that's IT and Tradesmen. You husband will need to retrain. He could build in a psychological component in games development.

 

Easy to say? I did it. My expertise is developing new products in manufacturing plants. Manufacturing started pulling out of Australia. I retrained on the regulatory and clinical aspects of pharmaceutical development. Very tough transition and hard to get jobs at first. But success after a few years.

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FromDurbs

Hi Everyone

 

Apologies for the silence.  As a time management attempt, I try to stay away from the internet as much as possible and the forum has been one of the ‘victims’ of this.

 

I want to start this update by thanking everyone for your advice, help, etc.  I was completely overwhelmed by the outpouring of assistance and even just best wishes from (even) complete strangers.  I got a few private messages and some really good advice and people sending us to friends who might help.

 

In short.  Husband is now working, in a related field.  He used to be a psychologist in private practice for 16 years in South Africa.  For the last 5 years he has worked first as a volunteer (one day a week) and the last two years as part time deputy director of a children’s home in South Africa.  His new job is in the foster care system in Australia.  He thus works with the skills he had in South Africa and does what he likes.  He is still not registered as a psychologist.  He is still trying to get that done.  The job does not require registration.  So it is a happy ending.  He started 2 weeks ago and is trying to find his feet, but loving it.  From my perspective he seems so much happier and I am a lot less worried about his mental state ! 

 

Our observations in the process:

We got the advice to volunteer to build up local references from many people.  THAT HAS NOT WORKED.  He tried everything to volunteer.  Most places have an application process online to be a volunteer and then nothing happens.  It seemed harder to be accepted as a volunteer than to get a job.  He personally went to meet with people to ask to volunteer, was referred by friends to the people needing volunteers, etc.  NO ONE GOT BACK TO HIM.  The only almost successful thing was to volunteer with the police to assist as an adult witness if under age children are interviewed.  He was slotted to start training, but our area does not have enough youth crime to warrant a volunteer (I see that as a good thing????)  This would have required several months of training before he could start working as a volunteer, so no quick solution.  I would therefore not suggest volunteering as a solution.

 

My teenagers started a paper route for pocket money.  Since dad was not working he joined them and all contact with the company went through husband.  He therefore had a local reference.  This paper route reference might have been pivotal in getting the job.  Somehow this local reference carried weight, even though all husband had to do was deliver newspapers somewhere over the weekend and update online that it was delivered.  He might also have been lucky that his supervisor tried very hard to give him a good reference. 

 

Getting the job takes time.  From completing the application to starting was months.  It takes time for the application to close, the interview to be arranged, HR to check your references and HR to complete your paperwork.

 

It did not seem like a job he was perfectly qualified for.  He did not tick all the essential requirements, but applied anyway and was quite upfront in both the cover letter and interview about not meeting some of the requirements, but highlighted how he thought his other experience and skills could help him to get up to speed quickly.   So my advice would be to apply for everything.

 

We have been in Australia for almost a year now, so husband was out of work for almost a year.  He did not look for work that long though, he only started looking actively in March after settling us in and an emergency trip back to SA in February.  So it was 5 months of actively looking for work, with the last month being fairly certain this company was going to hire him, but jumping through all the HR hoops. 

 

For other psychologists:  There are many jobs being advertised as requiring psychology background but not registration.  He was told by many that they received so many applications from registered psychologists that they did not consider anyone not registered.  Being registered would definitely help.  In hindsight we should have stayed in South Africa a bit longer and tried to get him registered before moving.  

 

By the way, it is a permanent, full time job, with a decent salary, at a big, stable company.  We are very happy.

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@FromDurbs Yeha... I love it when good news, like yours, is posted. Tell hubby, CONGRATULATIONS, and you should both take a bow, for your perseverance!

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