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RELATIVE VISA


Laiza
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Hi there!

 

My family and I are planning to immigrate to Australia within this year.

 

We have done our research but each website that provides info about visas differ.

 

What I would like to know is whether we qualify for a Remaining Relative Visa (115) ?

 

Applicants: Me, my fiancé and our 1 year old son.

 

Family in Aus: My fiancé's Grandmother, Aunt, Uncle and cousins. They live in Sydney.

 

I also want to know if the Remaining Relative Visa (115) requires our family in aus to sponsor us and if so what is the costs of sponsoring us?

 

Thanx in advance!

:)

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Hi Laiza,

 

Sadly you're not likely to be eligible for this VISA. If you've researched it you'll know that the "Remaining Relative VISA" is for a NEAR RELATIVE which is defined by Borders as:

 

Quote

 

Your parent or your partner's parent (including biological and step-parent), brother, sister, stepbrother or stepsister; child (including stepchild) who has turned 18 and is not a dependent child; or child (including stepchild) who has not yet turned 18 years of age and is not in your or your partner's daily care and control. We do not consider how much contact you have with near relatives when we make a decision about whether you are a remaining relative.

 

 

If that wasn't tough enough you'd also have to prove that you you have NO other living relatives outside of Australia.

 

Quote

 

Do not apply for this visa if:

  • you or your partner have any near relatives, who are usually living outside Australia, or are only living in Australia on a temporary visa, Bridging visa or unlawfully.

 

 

Cheers

 

Matt

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Agree Matt.  You literally have to be the only remaining person in RSA with no living blood relatives of any kind.  With parents and siblings still in RSA, you don't qualify.

 

As an aside: getting to Australia by the end of the year could be a bit unrealistic.  Most visas take a few months but the supporting documentation such as birth certificates etc have taken up to 12 months to get for some people.  Then there is the waiting time for the English exam, waiting time for getting assessments done, etc. etc.

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Even where eligible this visa has a current expected processing time of 30-50 years.

DIBP state

"Based on current Planning Levels and the allocation of the majority of the Other Family places to the Carer visa category, it is currently estimated that Remaining Relative and Aged Dependent Relative visa applications that were lodged in 2014 and meet the criteria to be queued are likely to take approximately 50 years to be released for final processing (calculated from 14 August 2014)."

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19 hours ago, TeeTMI said:

Even where eligible this visa has a current expected processing time of 30-50 years.

DIBP state

"Based on current Planning Levels and the allocation of the majority of the Other Family places to the Carer visa category, it is currently estimated that Remaining Relative and Aged Dependent Relative visa applications that were lodged in 2014 and meet the criteria to be queued are likely to take approximately 50 years to be released for final processing (calculated from 14 August 2014)."


Basically, if you are 20 years old now, you would still have a better chance of getting in on other visas, or else you might be able to spend your 70's in Australia...wow. Why don't they just scrap it then? That kind of waiting time is just like saying 'No'.

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@RedPanda I honestly think that is exactly what the government did, but without the outrage there would have been if they had scrapped it. The thing is, if you have plenty of money to support yourself, and you can get a visitor's visa that does not have a "change of visa" restriction on it, you can come and join your loved ones in Australia, whilst here you can put in your application, then apply for a bridging visa, and you can stay here until your visa is either granted or rejected. You cannot leave the country, you do not get any assistance from the government in any way whatsoever, so either you or your family will have to take daily responsibility for you, including any medical issues you may have.

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6 hours ago, RedPanda said:


Basically, if you are 20 years old now, you would still have a better chance of getting in on other visas, or else you might be able to spend your 70's in Australia...wow. Why don't they just scrap it then? That kind of waiting time is just like saying 'No'.

They did scrap it, but the Senate voted for the scrapping to be repealed, so the government solved it by extending he waiting times.

 

Effectively if any DIBP staff say they don't have enough to do and they should start looking at these visas they open themselves up to potential redundancies, so guess what??

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