Jump to content

Parent visa - any advice?


Vik51
 Share

Recommended Posts

Hello there,

I am new to the forum but having read some of the topics and responses this seems like the perfect place to voice my concerns and get some really good advice and support.

My hubby and I spent the month of May in Aus and loved it - we want to live there too.

My son is a PR and lives in Sydney, he is very keen for us to migrate. We have started the paperwork for the temp contributory parent visa which will give us a little extra time to find the full $32000. It seems we could be looking at a waiting period of +/- 2 years.

Here is our dilemma, I am 58 and the old man is 60, we are both very active and have all our bits in place. I am a Financial Manager/senior bookkeeper and hubby is a motor mechanic with many years experience and a huge amount of knowledge.

What are our chances of finding employment at our age, would we be better off staying here in SA given the fact that our RR's don't amount to much once converted and we don't have too many years left before old age really creeps up.

Has anyone in the forum made the change at a similar age, how did it turn out?

I feel we have a wonderful chance here, even if it did come a bit late in life.

Thanks in advance, V.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hi Vik51

Firstly welcome to SaAustralia, hope you get lots of info here!

With regard to your question. Good mechanics are always required, regardless of age! It may take him a little longer to find a job, but I am pretty sure there is going to be an intelligent garage owner out there that knows a good thing when it crosses his threshold! If that does not pan out, he could become a mobile mechanic and rent out his services, you would be amazed how many of them there are in Australia.

As for being a financial manager/bookkeeper, do not think you would have too much trouble finding a job. I know, as that is what I do, and I am always keeping my eye on the job ads, I am also the same age as you.

Please do not take my word for it, do your research diligently, let your son go and ask at some garages in Sydney and hear what they have to say about employing your hubby! Check out www.seek.com.au and see how many jobs there are for you.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hi Mara,

Thanks for the swift reply, shouldn't you be asleep?

I visit www.seek often and have seen some really good opportunities listed there but it is pointless following up on the vacancies until we have our application well under way. I have also emailed a few of the agencies that posted ads on seek and they all said the same thing "Please contact us as soon as you arrive in Aus". I am very hopefull.

As for the hubby, mechanics is his thing and there have also been a few oportunities in his field. While we were in Aus in May we noticed a lot of those "Wicked Vans" all over the place, their website also invites applicants and I am sure they always need good mechanics.

V.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

You could get a 457 visa which is a temporary 4 year visa allowing you to work in Australia.

This is a sppnsored visa which a company puts in for you.

Loads of garages can't get a qualified mechanic, or enough of them to keep up to requests and orders.

I know . . . my young bloke is a mechanic . . . . and he's got work coming out of his ears.

You'll need to look into this.

I know some of the mines out in the bush are desperate foir mechanics.

You might like to put in a feeler for work at one of the mines . . . . good money and conditions . . . if you can't get any joy in working around Sydney.

By the way . . . your young bloke is living in the most expensive part of Australia, where you have to sell one of your kids into slavery, just about, to get a house.

Life's a whole lot easier . . . .and cheaper . . . outside of Sydney.

You didn't mention what sort of mechanic your old man was.

Diesel mechanic? Motor mechanic? Small engines mechanic?

Edited by Bob
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hi Bob,

Yes thanks for that. I know Sydney is hugely expensive, great place to visit but not to live in. We travelled quite extensively from Sydney to Brisbane and saw many beautiful small towns we would be very happy to live in. Loved Port Macquarry also noticed that almost every motor vehicle manufacturer had an agency (lots of workshops).

Unfortunately the Aus gov seem to think that if you are over 45 you are in your dotage and getting in on a skilled visa is almost impossible. Although it is a huge cost, the parent visa 143 seems to be our best bet.

This is very scary but exciting too.

Cheers, V.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Oops forgot to mention, the old man's motto is "if its got wheels I can fix it" but he is mostly a petrol mechanic, small, big whatever.

New technology is a bit of a challenge, more IT than mechanics these days with everything being computerised - much prefers the good old fashioned carb & distributor.

Edited by Vik51
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hi Bob,

Yes thanks for that. I know Sydney is hugely expensive, great place to visit but not to live in. We travelled quite extensively from Sydney to Brisbane and saw many beautiful small towns we would be very happy to live in. Loved Port Macquarry also noticed that almost every motor vehicle manufacturer had an agency (lots of workshops).

Unfortunately the Aus gov seem to think that if you are over 45 you are in your dotage and getting in on a skilled visa is almost impossible. Although it is a huge cost, the parent visa 143 seems to be our best bet.

This is very scary but exciting too.

Cheers, V.

Dear V,

I am going in on 143 visa. Yes it is going to be costly but it has a lot of benefits.

Instant PR.

Able to live where you want to.

Able to work for who you want to.... and to chop and change.

Immediate medical . That is what the $31 000 per adult is for.

There is $10 000 for 1st person and $4000 for second person for your son to sponsor you. This goes to Centrelink in caes you need to use some welfare. It is paid back to him in 10 years time.

I am 46 and my husband 51, so this is going to be great for us. We applied in May 2008 and strated off as 1840th in the Q. Today I am 140th in the Q. Almost there.

Good luck.. PM me... I have a few other sugguestions for you.

Regards

Joanna

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Unfortunately the Aus gov seem to think that if you are over 45 you are in your dotage and getting in on a skilled visa is almost impossible. Although it is a huge cost, the parent visa 143 seems to be our best bet.

No, Vik, I don't think that's what the gov seems to think. The rationale is that in if you're young and have the required skills to be granted PR it's assumed that you have many decades ahead of you when you will contribute to the economy by working and the government coffers by paying tax. The gov lets older people in so that families can be together (thereby reducing the number of skilled people returning to their birth countries) despite the fact that they may not be as productive as younger immigrants.

My mother came in at the age of 60, and although the visa is costly she's always viewed it as "back taxes" - compared with how much she paid in tax over the first 40 years of working it doesn't seem that expensive. I know that she found the first six months here hard; however once she decided to look for work she had a job offer within days and she hasn't looked back (personally or professionally) since. She earns a fantastic salary, is highly thought of in her industry, and has bought her own place in a really nice suburb close to the river and the city. She has a social life I am envious of and travels overseas every year.

Most people I know here are quite prepared to employ older people, and most of the older people I know work at least part time, through choice. Both you and your hubby have good skills and it would appear that you have the required attitude to make such a huge leap. Added to this is the reality of being close to family and living in one of the most beautiful countries on earth - you can't go wrong!

Good luck with the application

C'Lou

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thanks Cindylou, the dark clouds of uncertainty are beginning to lift - I love this forum.

You are right when you say family is important, with my son in Aus and my daughter in the USA we really miss the connection & it would help if we were at least on the same continent.

I am happy to pay the contributary fee (its less than our medical aid over time) but just not all at once so splitting it in 2 is a help but may delay getting the visa.

Does your Mom not have any regrets? I think your frame of mind when you make the decision to uproot yourself has to be in the right place. The funny thing is that I had never been to Aus before our trip in May but I felt I belonged so for me it will be like going home. Perhaps I lived there in a previous life!!!!

Thanks for all your support, Vikki.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Does your Mom not have any regrets?

Absolutely none! As I said, the first six months were hard, but I think it was because she wasn't working and that just doesn't suit her personality. Since then she has taken to Aus like the proverbial duck. She's been back twice to SA in four years and both times it was only because she wanted to visit family (last trip was one week!) Her biggest regret is that she didn't come earlier and she is sadest about her sibllings still in SA (she's always trying to persuade them to move here)

I think your frame of mind when you make the decision to uproot yourself has to be in the right place.

I think you're correct - you need to believe in yourself, but understand that it can also be really hard to move. I still struggle sometimes and am still v emotional and I've been here for a year (with most of my family as support)so I take my hat off to people who go it alone.

The funny thing is that I had never been to Aus before our trip in May but I felt I belonged so for me it will be like going home. Perhaps I lived there in a previous life!!!!

It's deja vu in reverse :stretcher:

C'Lou

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hi ViKki

Like Mara I also fall into the "mature age" category :jester:

If I had to choose (again) between growing old in the RSA or in Australia, I would definitely choose Australia - and did. B) Add to that the fact you will also be closer to your son.........

Australia is a great country to live in and you will be fine here, regardless of your age. It is always tougher for older people to find employment but it is not an insurmountable problem/challenge.

Best of luck with your move.

Enjoy!

Manny

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...