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Bunny Chow


Kim C
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I was just wondering if you can get bunny's in Perth anywhere? We will really miss those if you can't get them! Otherwise, I need to find a nice recipe to bring with me so I can make my own!

Can you buy nice spices over there?

Thanks

K

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Hi

Hey man , this is Perth not Durban!!!!!!!We still need to fiund a SA Indian that has openned a resturant/take away.

So to bad so sad , you need to bring your recipe from Durban until such time as someone opens a Duban nResturant/Cafe/take Away

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Hi

Hey man , this is Perth not Durban!!!!!!!We still need to fiund a SA Indian that has openned a resturant/take away.

So to bad so sad , you need to bring your recipe from Durban until such time as someone opens a Duban nResturant/Cafe/take Away

I know, I know, nice try though hey!! Better brush up on my curry making skills... have to get my indian friends to show me the way!

Once I've mastered the art, I will maybe start a business... I am sure there are others who miss the good ol' bunny!

Cheers

K

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I found a recipe for Bunny Chow on the internet. There is also a nice explanation as to where the name comes from, and no, it does not refer to small, furry animals.

Bunny Chow was what the Indian sugar plantation workers took as their day's food to the lands: curry in hollowed-out bread halves.

By the way, the cilantro that is referred to in the recipe, is fresh coriander leaves.

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As usual, there are a number of conflicting stories as to the origins of bunny chow. When I was a child in Durban this is the story I was told:

it was invented for the Indian caddies at the Royal Durban Golf Course who were unable to get off from work for long enough to nip into Grey Street for a curry at lunchtime. The story goes that they got their friends to go and buy the curry for them and that it was brought back to the golf course in hollowed-out loaves of bread because there were no disposable food containers at the time.
More on the Bunny Chow
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As usual, there are a number of conflicting stories as to the origins of bunny chow. When I was a child in Durban this is the story I was told:

More on the Bunny Chow

Hi Cindylou

I like this story..........

Bunnychow, is defintly a Durban Indian thing!!!

There was an South African Indian thinking of openning a resturant, but he has not done anything about it.

He also used to sell the curry spices and curry mixes....not sure if he still is doing it.

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I found a recipe for Bunny Chow on the internet. There is also a nice explanation as to where the name comes from, and no, it does not refer to small, furry animals.

By the way, the cilantro that is referred to in the recipe, is fresh coriander leaves.

Thanks Janneman, I will start practising!! Yummy :ilikeit:

I am hoping there will be somebody there who sells the spices, etc. Sure there will be though!!

Kim

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Wow, how my mouth is watering, bunny and sambles with milk!!! Yum

Monica

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when we first arrived here, we shared the company home with a couple of indian men, straight fom india..they had of course never heard of a bunny chow, (( it was originated when tthe indian workers were out in the canefields, in south africa,and they packed their lunch into leaves...(to cut a long story short))

..but since we heve intorduced it to them, they love it, they make the curry we assemble the bunnies..except me, I have never liked them, even being a banana girl, we have learnt thought not to buy curry ingredients from supermarkets but to go to the asian shops...the curry from woollies tastes like aromat....

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when we first arrived here, we shared the company home with a couple of indian men, straight fom india..they had of course never heard of a bunny chow, (( it was originated when tthe indian workers were out in the canefields, in south africa,and they packed their lunch into leaves...(to cut a long story short))

..but since we heve intorduced it to them, they love it, they make the curry we assemble the bunnies..except me, I have never liked them, even being a banana girl, we have learnt thought not to buy curry ingredients from supermarkets but to go to the asian shops...the curry from woollies tastes like aromat....

Ah some good advice, thanks Lyall!! I'll remember that!!

Kim

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Any suggestions for a good Indian restaurant in Perth? I have tried a few but don’t like any so far? Or Malaysian?

Edited by GerhardinOz
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Not sure if you're South or North, but Flames Cafe in Rossmoyne (SOR just off Leach Highway) has a Wednesday night Indian Buffet that is rather good. One of the owners is from India and his family do the cooking so the food is authentic although its not all hot; they do have achter and other sambels which you can spice the meal up with. We like to go there and then walk home "the long way round" as we're always so full!

Grand Indian Flavours is an inexpensive option; I haven't had food from all the branches but the one in the city is good! There are branches in Langford, Perth, Riverton and Armadale.

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Hi All

My friends are constantly complaining that the Indian curries here in Aus cannot compare to the ones back in Durban...the issue...coconut. Who puts coconut... and raisins in curries.

The biggest letdown is that most of the Indian restaurants here in Aus, use cook in sauces instead of cooking the curries from scratch.

For those who miss the old bunny chow....

http://photosforthefuture.thehistorychanne.../4550_photo.jpg

http://www.bizforsale.co.za/fran_page/701_Bunny.jpg

NAL

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Hi All

My friends are constantly complaining that the Indian curries here in Aus cannot compare to the ones back in Durban...the issue...coconut. Who puts coconut... and raisins in curries.

The biggest letdown is that most of the Indian restaurants here in Aus, use cook in sauces instead of cooking the curries from scratch.

For those who miss the old bunny chow....

http://photosforthefuture.thehistorychanne.../4550_photo.jpg

http://www.bizforsale.co.za/fran_page/701_Bunny.jpg

NAL

That is what I was thinking. I lived in a small town (Free State) in SA, so I have to compare it to Indian food in New Zealand and it is not as good.

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  • 2 months later...

anybody know where i can buy indian spices in lower north shore sydney ?

One would think maybe chatswood my china :)

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We have an Indian take away in Mackay, run by an Indian from Pinetown!

So we can get bunny chow, samoosas etc, unfortunately Mackay is 200km away so I have only had the pleasure once so far.

When I lived in Albany we met an Indian couple at my husbands work, they brought about 5kg of Durban curry powder through customs at Perth - I still don't know how they got that right.

I still have loads of curry and chilli powder that they left me.

If you don't want to mess around making your own masala, why not try the jars of curry paste, Sharwoods ( I used to use this in the U.K) and Pataks ( I think you can get this at Spar's in RSA) are lovely.

I have tandoori, rogan josh and vindaloo in my fridge all the time and just add extra garlic, ginger, bit of fresh chilli and coriander because I like lots of that.

Alternatively you can pick up a lot of the ingredients at Asian deli's.

Coconut is actually added to lots of authentic Indian curries- but fresh or the dessicated kind, it thickens the sauce really nicely.

Australian curries, be it Thai or whatever, seem to have a lot of coconut milk which is too sweet for my taste.

I love curry and have it at least twice a week.

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This topic really makes one struggle to define what is a "South African". What with all the talk on good Durban Indian curry, and masala, and indian spices............ :(

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  • 4 weeks later...

Salvation at last. The Indian Doctor from Pietermaritzburg , that my son saw yesterday, happens to be living temporarily with some other Indians from Durban.

And guess what mense, they own an pukka Durban Indian resturant in Joondalup.

Better still they sell Bunny Chows.

This fine establishment is called

Govendors Fish and Chips apparently

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Hi All,

I have been to Govender's in Regents Park Road (Nottinghill St), Joondalup... I also asked the owner for a "Bunny", but he said there is not enough demand and the locals don't know what it is :ilikeit:

I did buy some of their Lamb Curry which was fantastic.

This web site lists Indian eating places in Perth, but lists Govender's in Woodvale, don't think they are there ... (http://www.eatability.com.au/au/perth/cuisines/indian.htm)

Let us know if you get Govender's to make you a "Bunny", I'll be his next customer.

Ausraven

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  • 3 months later...

the origins of the word"bunny chow".

of the indentured labourers that came from india,there were tamils, hindu and muslim.

a colloquial slang amongst the indian for some sects of hindu who were total vegans and vegetarian was "baanyia". a word not in the best of taste.anyhow,

indians were very poor and lived within very close knit communities.so name slinging was the order of the day.but not violence.

even religion fighting in india has never and will never affect the indians in south africa.simply,because there is much greater tollerence here in south africa.

back to my theory,well since white man was taking lunch to work in the form of bread sandwiches,the indian had to follw suit.

the poor indian "aunty" did not have the slightest idea what a darn sandwich was.and being of the submissive type came up with the idea of hollowing the half loaf and use the left over curry(veg,ofcourse) as a filling.

since the baaniya was now taking chow to work,the temptation was too great not to comment upon.hence "baaniya chow" became "bunny chow".

my fellow indians, please forgive me if i have offended anyone.i was merely giving insight into a probable origin of the word "bunny chow". i am open to any other suggestions for the origin of this word.

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Wow, how my mouth is watering, bunny and sambles with milk!!! Yum

Monica

Hi Monica

You are soooooooooo right, yummmmmyyyyy!!!

EricaC :ilikeit:

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