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Contributory Parent 143 Visa Support group


Elna57

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2 hours ago, SGS143 said:

Hi @AJM22,

 

Thank you so much for your detailed analysis. It is very disheartening to look at these numbers. 

 

Could I please confirm one of your calculations ? You are suggesting that if you applied for 143 Visa in June 2016 it would take 6 months to get it. But this ignores the fact that there were already about 30,000 people in the que as at 30 June 2016. So the real wait is around 8 years (30,000/3,600 assuming that only 3,600 visa are granted since June 2016, which is lower than actual numbers from from 2016 to 2019). If my interpretation of your numbers is correct and someone has applied in September 2017 (using actual visa granted and an assumption of 3600 visas granted from 2020 onwards) they will get the visa in mid 2029, which is equivalent to around 12 years of waiting period. Is that correct ?

 

Thanks Again !

 

Hi  SGS143

 

The numbers are disheartening and many people have applied for the 143 visa without being made aware of how large the queue has grown along with further delays due to annual CPV 143 cap being reduced significantly.

 

No the calculations do not indicate that if you applied for the 143 Visa in June 2016 that it would take six months to get it. The 2nd table shows outstanding visa applications/month that have yet to be released for final processing as of 30th October 2020 for applications in the period June 2016 until September 2020. The end column "years to process" gives an idea of how long the outstanding applications made in each month will take to process based on the queue as of October 2020 assuming that annual 143 visa cap of 3600 places is fulfilled each year. In this case the overall processing time for applications made in June 2016 would be approximately 5 years as they should be released for processing during this migration year.

 

For a 143 visa application made in September 2017 the cumulative number of outstanding 143 visa applications in the queue as of October 2020 was 20795. Based on an annual 143 visa cap of 3600 places it is estimated that it will take a further 5.75 years for these to be processed as of October 2020 (20795 divided by 3600) which takes you to around about July 2026 which would be equivalent to around about  9 years of waiting. This assumes that annual 143 visa cap is fulfilled each migration year.

 

The situation is considerably worse for anyone applying September 2020 onwards. As of October 2020 for 143 visa applications made in September 2020 the outstanding number of applications in the queue was 49688. Based on the annual cap of 3600- 143 visa applications made in September 2020 would take approx 13.8 years to be approved (49688 divided by 3600).

 

You can only hope that the Australian government review parent visas and increase the annual cap significantly to clear the backlog especially for the CPV143 visa where the whole point of paying the higher amount for the visa was to fast track entry and to be reunited with family.

 

They have increased the annual cap on partner applications significantly from 39799 places in 2019/20 to 72300 places in 2020/21 and 2021/22. 

 

 

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Do we know what the average amount of visas are per processing year that "fall out" due to change of mind or not being eligible for the 143 category? I read once it was about 20% but I can't confirm this number. 

 

What a waste of money for so many people. My mum put away half of her pension for the visa and the initial instalment but her funds are running low as the time just got LONGER AND LONGER. On our original timeline she would have been very close to joining us by now and yet she has another 5 years to go.

 

The reality is she will have to use her visa money to live on. So...... I feel angry and frustrated.

 

 

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19 hours ago, AJM22 said:

Hi  SGS143

 

The numbers are disheartening and many people have applied for the 143 visa without being made aware of how large the queue has grown along with further delays due to annual CPV 143 cap being reduced significantly.

 

No the calculations do not indicate that if you applied for the 143 Visa in June 2016 that it would take six months to get it. The 2nd table shows outstanding visa applications/month that have yet to be released for final processing as of 30th October 2020 for applications in the period June 2016 until September 2020. The end column "years to process" gives an idea of how long the outstanding applications made in each month will take to process based on the queue as of October 2020 assuming that annual 143 visa cap of 3600 places is fulfilled each year. In this case the overall processing time for applications made in June 2016 would be approximately 5 years as they should be released for processing during this migration year.

 

For a 143 visa application made in September 2017 the cumulative number of outstanding 143 visa applications in the queue as of October 2020 was 20795. Based on an annual 143 visa cap of 3600 places it is estimated that it will take a further 5.75 years for these to be processed as of October 2020 (20795 divided by 3600) which takes you to around about July 2026 which would be equivalent to around about  9 years of waiting. This assumes that annual 143 visa cap is fulfilled each migration year.

 

The situation is considerably worse for anyone applying September 2020 onwards. As of October 2020 for 143 visa applications made in September 2020 the outstanding number of applications in the queue was 49688. Based on the annual cap of 3600- 143 visa applications made in September 2020 would take approx 13.8 years to be approved (49688 divided by 3600).

 

You can only hope that the Australian government review parent visas and increase the annual cap significantly to clear the backlog especially for the CPV143 visa where the whole point of paying the higher amount for the visa was to fast track entry and to be reunited with family.

 

They have increased the annual cap on partner applications significantly from 39799 places in 2019/20 to 72300 places in 2020/21 and 2021/22. 

 

 

Thank you so much for explaining this in more detail. I understand Government's reasoning behind that decision, however, Australia might start loosing a lot of young professionals who will choose not to come to Australia or leave Australia to be with their parents. I'm really not sure how economically beneficial this decision is. 

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5 hours ago, SGS143 said:

Thank you so much for explaining this in more detail. I understand Government's reasoning behind that decision, however, Australia might start loosing a lot of young professionals who will choose not to come to Australia or leave Australia to be with their parents. I'm really not sure how economically beneficial this decision is. 

I agree completely with you that the decision to reduce parent visa allocations may not be economically beneficial as Australia's economic growth has been founded on immigration and attracting young skilled professionals over the past 30 years. Australia is a country built on migration and if they cannot attract or retain these young professionals due to them being isolated from their parents the risk is they will look to settle elsewhere in countries such as Canada. 

Hopefully the Government will have a review of their policy regarding parent visas and allocate more annual places to ensure it is able to continue to attract young professionals into the country as Australia cannot rely on natural population growth to boost its numbers to grow the economy going forward. 

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10 hours ago, Mel-B said:

Do we know what the average amount of visas are per processing year that "fall out" due to change of mind or not being eligible for the 143 category? I read once it was about 20% but I can't confirm this number. 

 

What a waste of money for so many people. My mum put away half of her pension for the visa and the initial instalment but her funds are running low as the time just got LONGER AND LONGER. On our original timeline she would have been very close to joining us by now and yet she has another 5 years to go.

 

The reality is she will have to use her visa money to live on. So...... I feel angry and frustrated.

 

 

Mel-B  I understand your frustration

 

I have a family member who is trying to relocate to Australia to be with his daughter and grandchildren and who applied for his 143 CPV in Oct 2017 and who was anticipating being over in Australia by the end of this year, however realistically based on the outstanding queue as of October 2020 and reduced allocation/cap along with shortfall on visa grant it is likely it will be at least another 6 years before his visa may be granted. 

The frustrating part is that the emigration agent that is handling his case appear oblivious to the number of outstanding applications in the queue and keep being over optimistic.  

In his case the 3300 143 CPV applications made in May 2017 and 5185 43 CPV applications made in June 2017 have impacted severely as these two months alone will take nearly 2.5 years to clear based on the current 3600 annual cap for CPV 143 visas.

 

The rejection rate for Contributory visas is generally less than Non Contributory visas. Even if you assume a rejection rate 10% for various reasons this makes very little difference to the already sizeable queue where processing time is further impacted by the governments decision to lower the annual cap for parent visas.

 

It is all very disappointing especially as the whole point of applying for the CPV 143 visa whilst paying the higher fee was to allow fast-track entry into Australia for applications based on the original queue size/higher annual cap where the visa would generally be granted in under 3 years. 

 

 

 

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Based on the new processing time for the 143 (assumed processing time based on the cap and number of applications) is the 173 + 143 a more attractive option? Would that result in a faster time to ultimately getting the 143? Or is the 173 influenced by the same cap? 

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I believe if you apply for a Contributory  173 Temporary visa that this is  influenced by the same cap. If applying for a 173 Visa Temporary visa and then subsequently applying for the  Contributory 143 Permanent visa later I believe the application queue date for the 143 visa application will reflect the date that you originally applied for the 173 Temporary visa but I suggest you get this confirmed.

 

https://www.legislation.gov.au/Details/F2021L00511

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I have a question I’m waiting for my parents to get their 143 visa from June 2017

if they become able to come to Australia soon can I change their application to another onshore visa? For example apply for 864?

Will then they back to the beginning of the queue or they will consider their waiting time from 2017?

Or Is there anyway we notify they are now inside the Australian so that they  consider their current  143 application as onshore?

Edited by Sahba
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I'm glad to see people are talking about this problem. It really is very disheartening to have such a low cap being applied to parents - I really hope that the inquiry into this issue helps to result in a fairer immigration system. At the very least, the 143 visa processing needs to be sped up once COVID19 is behind us.

 

Just in case anyone missed it - https://www.aph.gov.au/Parliamentary_Business/Committees/Senate/Legal_and_Constitutional_Affairs/FamilyandPartnerVisas

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27 minutes ago, Donovan83 said:

I'm glad to see people are talking about this problem. It really is very disheartening to have such a low cap being applied to parents - I really hope that the inquiry into this issue helps to result in a fairer immigration system. At the very least, the 143 visa processing needs to be sped up once COVID19 is behind us.

 

Just in case anyone missed it - https://www.aph.gov.au/Parliamentary_Business/Committees/Senate/Legal_and_Constitutional_Affairs/FamilyandPartnerVisas

 

The submissions to the Senate Enquiry can be reviewed using the link below.

 

Submissions from the public and other organisations ended in April 2021 and the report is due out on 10 August 2021

 

https://www.aph.gov.au/Parliamentary_Business/Committees/Senate/Legal_and_Constitutional_Affairs/FamilyandPartnerVisas

 

https://www.aph.gov.au/Parliamentary_Business/Committees/Senate/Legal_and_Constitutional_Affairs/FamilyandPartnerVisas/Media_Releases

 

https://www.aph.gov.au/Parliamentary_Business/Committees/Senate/Legal_and_Constitutional_Affairs/FamilyandPartnerVisas/Submissions

 

https://www.aph.gov.au/Parliamentary_Business/Committees/Senate/Legal_and_Constitutional_Affairs/FamilyandPartnerVisas/Public_Hearings

 

Submission 60 gives a good account of the situation regarding Contributory Parent Visas however only 64 submissions were made to the Senate Enquiry. (link to submission 60 below).

 

Submission 60.pdf

 

Chart below regarding Contributory Parent Visa Activity from submission made by The Office of Home Affairs. 

image.png.4669b70dd151f6114ba103a7e05057e2.png

 

 

 

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13 minutes ago, AJM22 said:

 

The submissions to the Senate Enquiry can be reviewed using the link below.

 

Submissions from the public and other organisations ended in April 2021 and the report is due out on 10 August 2021

 

https://www.aph.gov.au/Parliamentary_Business/Committees/Senate/Legal_and_Constitutional_Affairs/FamilyandPartnerVisas

 

https://www.aph.gov.au/Parliamentary_Business/Committees/Senate/Legal_and_Constitutional_Affairs/FamilyandPartnerVisas/Media_Releases

 

https://www.aph.gov.au/Parliamentary_Business/Committees/Senate/Legal_and_Constitutional_Affairs/FamilyandPartnerVisas/Submissions

 

https://www.aph.gov.au/Parliamentary_Business/Committees/Senate/Legal_and_Constitutional_Affairs/FamilyandPartnerVisas/Public_Hearings

 

Submission 60 gives a good account of the situation regarding Contributory Parent Visas however only 64 submissions were made to the Senate Enquiry. (link to submission 60 below).

 

Submission 60.pdf

 

Chart below regarding Contributory Parent Visa Activity from submission made by The Office of Home Affairs. 

image.png.4669b70dd151f6114ba103a7e05057e2.png

 

 

 

 

Response to questions on notice from the Law Council of Australia- see page 6

 

https://www.aph.gov.au/DocumentStore.ashx?id=20a56c2e-6c61-4271-84da-b250e7e1ddcb

 

 

 

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@WendyAllison

Have you heard anything yet about your application?

Would be great to hear some good news.

We have been in Australia for almost 4 years and in February 2022 we will be able to apply for citizenship. I am very excited about that.

Good luck to everyone in the queue and let's all hope that everything will speed up after Covid. (If there ever will be such a thing as 'after Covid'.)

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