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I can just feel so angry with you guys who are leaving..in a good way though!


Bloem860602

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I think it is more jealousy than anything else,haha...but congratulations !

If I may ask, what has the most difficult part of your application process been?

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Hi Bloem,

The application for us was the easy part (came over on 457). The hardest part was saying goodbye to the family and closest friends on the day we got on the plane. That was now more than 4 years ago though. Life goes on and we've not looked back.

z

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Hi Bloem ! Don' get angry, get even ... LOL

The hardest part for me was waiting. For 4 years I was waiting, firstly waiting for time to pass on my 457 Visa so I can apply for PR. Then the company I worked for landed in financial hardship, and I was waiting for Immigration to cancel my 457. After 2 years I lodged my first stage Spouse visa application, and I waited 5 months for it to be approved. Then I waited for 2 years to pass to lodge my second stage Spouse visa & PR, I waited 3 loooong months, wondering, worrying that for some reason my application for Permanent Residence will be denied.

With the grace God, that did not happen. Now I can think and plan my future for the rest of my life, not just the next 5 years !

So patience and perseverance is all you really need !

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Waiting is the hardest part - you need a strong dose of patience!!

Getting on the plane was hard because there is so much uncertainty about when you will see friends and family again - good byes are not easy

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Currently, the hardest part is waiting. Two years has just passed and no guarantees for anything, we're in Category 5. So I echo the patience, patience, patience. And not to read or watch too much news, too much papers, too much paper ads on the streetlight poles ...

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waiting and the continuous changes that cause the waiting times to bounce around so that there is no certainty as to when it will happen!

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Related to waiting - that feeling of being in limbo. You are neither here nor there yet. That uncertainty of where you will end up (possibly your application may get denied due to some fine-print or mistake or policies may change - its not likely, but it is a concern). This makes you hesitant to start new things or make plans - its like you are just existing. I really hated that.

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Yeah, I agree with you Gizmo, the feeling of being nowhere, you only exist with nothing to attach to. Not nice.

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Waiting for a CO was a bit stressful but the hardest part is the goodbyes to family and friends, especially elderly parents.

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  • 4 weeks later...

I have to agree with the being in limbo thing, I can't take it and having to have patience (I'm a want it now kinda guy) so I guess for me the learning curve that goes with the process has been the hardest.

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  • 2 weeks later...

Definitely the waiting! AND I must agree with Gizmo. Once you have lodged your application you're not sure of the way forward - you know where you want to end up but it takes time and alot of patience. In the end I'm sure it will all be worth it. Just hang in there!

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mmm ... for me it was trying to get all the documents needed for the skills assessment ... especially reference letters etc ... and after my CO was assigned, they asked for more evidence of work experience .. like contracts, tax forms , salaries, etc etc etc ... this was indeed the hardest.

2nd was the unabridged certificates from home affairs ... to apply and then the wait for them.

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The physical application went very smooth and easy. I was very scared of the IELTS test! But that turned out to be OK. The hardest parts were the emotional side:

I must agree that the waiting and "limbo" feeling was the hardest. Another difficulty is the very short term planning. Every time I see a good special at SPAR or P'nP I am not sure how many of the product I should buy ... because I am not sure if we will be out-a-here in a month's time or in 3 years time!!! It is a reality hangning over your head with every decision. I did not pay the schoolfees annually in advance, because I was not sure how long the kids will be in school still and the poor kids could not start a new sport / activity at school, because we did not know if it will be worth the while for such a short time...

Now we have a date and the saying good bye is hanging over my head :cry:

Something else which was very difficult was that I lost some good friends during the application and waiting process. Friends who felt it is not worth hanging on to the friendship because we are leaving etc. (I suppose it is their loss ... but it is still sad!)

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Our worst part was when we had submitted my degree for assessment to come in on a Professional Visa (can't remember the exact one) sold our farm as we were so certain that we would get in to Australia and then my qualification was deemed NOT on the same level as an Australian B.Ed . Aaaaaaaaaaaaaah-panic stations but thanks to our wonderful agents (Loseby and Co.) they found I was qualified on the sills migration list as a child care director. Phew. Got the visa lodged a few days before I turned 45 .....

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After waiting for over a year for our PR to be approved, realizing that if it had been delayed for another 30 days I would have qualified for citizenship a year earlier. ( all to do with been in the country legally, change of the rules and been a NZ citizen)

I wrote a number of exams to become an Australian Chartered Accountant before I applied for PR. I was told by DICA that I needed to have my qualification assessed. I had to get the Australian Institute of Chartered Accountants to say I was good enough to be an Australian Chartered Accountant, because I was an Australian Chartered Accountant. They couldn't believe it, but had the good grace not to charge me for doing the assessment.

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