Jump to content

Recommended Posts

Hi

 

Ever since April this year I've been thinking to migrate but haven't put in a lot of effort yet except for reading.

I am eligible for a 189 PR Visa as I'm a Mechanical Engineer with approximately 5 years experience in both Chemical and Power Generation industries.

If I get the maximum points for the IELTS I will be having 70 points with the possibility to increase this to 75 next year April.

The whole process of leaving everything behind like a decent job, properties and then most important your family is something that we still need to overcome.

However every time when there are increased political instability or crime I just know the move will be for the best.

 

I've also appointed Migrate2Oz as my migration agent and currently I'm busy compiling my work experience documentation.

What I actually would like to find out is it worth it to migrate without a job and how do select which state?

Also how long would it generally take to get a decent job with a good salary?

 

Regards 

 

Carl

 

Link to post
Share on other sites
SimpleSimon

Q1. As @Mara says, follow the jobs. Check out www.seek.com.au to see where they are.

 

The East coast with Melbourne, Sydney and Brisbane within easy flying time of each other has ~ 75% of the countries population. Hence that’s where most of the jobs are for engineers. WA used to be great for engineers but the mining industry went off the boil when China slowed down.

 

Sydney is one of the most expensive cities in the world because it is beautiful, weather is great and a decent form of sport is played (not aerial ping pong). You will burn through your cash very quickly there. Melbourne is cheaper, but weather can get you down. Brisbane we don’t talk about because of something called “State of Origin”.

 

It doesn’t take long to get a job if you’re flexible, you say the right things and have an attitude that Aussies like.

Despite only having 1 out of 3 I got my job in science/engineering within 3 months. My holiday came to a premature end. I was an academically trained scientist and on-the-job trained engineer (chemical and pharmaceutical processing).

However, it took me 3 years to get a “decent” job as it slowly dawned on me that I had to change my ways. (See my other threads for more detail).

 

We came to Oz without jobs and a 1 year old daughter 23 years ago. It’s the best thing we ever did. 

 

Good luck.

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Thank you!

 

The move for us is also largely motivated by the future of our children.

Currently we have a daughter now 20 months and a second due next year May.

I will definitely spend more time on the career or job websites!

Link to post
Share on other sites

@Carl Let me put it this way... I am the youngest of five children, at the time we left RSA, hubby and I were both 44... We had to start all over again, with 2 children at university... We also left behind all of our family, a thriving business, property and great friends...

 

Now 24 years later, what can I say... YEHA! I am so glad that we threw caution to the winds, stopped trying to analyze everything and left. I have retired, hubby is still working and both our son's have very successful careers... We do not want for anything and NO, we do not own our own business. We decided when we left RSA that we were not going to start another business... we had enough stress that way. If I had children as young as yours, all you have to do is look back 20 years, look at how much RSA has changed, for the worse, then ask yourself, if it carries on at this rate, what will your children face in their future there...

 

Honestly... I have many friends and family, who thought we were crazy at the time... now wishing they had done the same thing...

Edited by Mara
  • Like 4
  • Thanks 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
RedPanda

I would definitely say go on seek.com.au to get an idea of where the vacancies are. You can also try to read up and find out where projects are planned/happening. I think Australia has more opportunities for mechanical engineers than RSA, from the little I've heard. The government supports infrastructure upgrades, and this does create jobs in the engineering sector.

How long will it take? Nobody really knows. Most people find some work in 3 months. This is not always the work they want, but mostly they get sorted for a job that aligns with their qualifications in about a year. Like I said, you might vary a little either way of this average.

Yes it's daunting to think of leaving everything and everyone you know. But if you know that you are going to migrate, do it as soon as possible because otherwise you are just wasting your time. It's hard work starting over on the other side, building up new contacts, getting to know the area, the new rules, the different products, food that's not the same and a slightly different culture. But the sooner you start, the sooner you will get used to it all.

It's a bandaid - rip it off.

  • Like 2
  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
SimpleSimon

We migrated in our early 30’s with a young daughter and it’s worked out very well. My brother migrated in his 50’s and it hasn’t worked out at all. The sooner the better.

Link to post
Share on other sites
5 hours ago, SimpleSimon said:

We migrated in our early 30’s with a young daughter and it’s worked out very well. My brother migrated in his 50’s and it hasn’t worked out at all. The sooner the better.

 

Totally agree.  I worry about those who squeeze in under the 45 year old criteria for application and then eek out their "last days" in RSA to make the most of the 5 years allowed to finally move to Australia, making them almost 50 when they get here. I know two families who have done this despite being told that "finishing well" in RSA would not give them the best start in Australia.  They thought they knew best and are now bitter about their circumstances here and harp on about the high life they had in RSA. It's hard not to keep saying I told you so...

  • Like 3
Link to post
Share on other sites
TakeItOnTheChin
51 minutes ago, RYLC said:

 

Totally agree.  I worry about those who squeeze in under the 45 year old criteria for application and then eek out their "last days" in RSA to make the most of the 5 years allowed to finally move to Australia, making them almost 50 when they get here. I know two families who have done this despite being told that "finishing well" in RSA would not give them the best start in Australia.  They thought they knew best and are now bitter about their circumstances here and harp on about the high life they had in RSA. It's hard not to keep saying I told you so...

It's not the same for all. I am 48, came here last year and loving it, and have a great job. Certainly coming here earlier is better, but for those in the 40's, please don't be discouraged. It's all about attitude and coming over for the right reason. My kids will have great benefit

  • Like 4
Link to post
Share on other sites

Nice to hear there are exceptions and it's worked out for you.

 

I was referring more to those who HAVE their visa and COULD have arrived by now but have procrastinated / waited for I don't know what and then complain and lament their old life.  Ageism is alive and well in Australia and people need to know that. Some states run specific services for job seekers over 40 because of this. Those who are determined will always find a life for themselves here but it takes effort and isn't the easy thing it was during the boom years.  Obviously the person's occupation also makes a difference.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
SimpleSimon

I don’t think it’s about age, it’s about attitude. However, the younger you are, the less likely you are to be set in your ways when you come over.

 

Both my brothers talk about “Africa is in your blood” and go back reasonably regularly almost on an annual basis. One was in his 30s and the other in his 50s when they came over. Both reminisce constantly about the life in South Africa.

 

My family calls Sydney home and we’ve taken on everything Australia has to offer. We’ve been back 3 times - a year after we left because in those days you could only take out tourist allowance, 2004 when my father-in-law died, and finally earlier this year to show our son his heritage.

 

I believe we’ve had a much happier time than my brothers’ families.

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
11 hours ago, RYLC said:

Ageism is alive and well in Australia and people need to know that.

 

1++

A lot has been said/written about this and it's no different to other countries like the USA. In fact, many surveys suggested that due to a lack of personal career planning by aged people they become unemployable. The job markets change.

The problem is complex as statistics don't always include all categories of people not looking for work. Often people gave up looking for work and then fall off the statistics radar. 

This old report 2012 (worth a read) http://melbourneinstitute.unimelb.edu.au/assets/documents/hilda-bibliography/other-publications/2011/Keegan-ACE-paper-Unemployment-income-support.pdf

Page 7: "Being too old is the main reason why potential workers state that they are discouraged from seeking work.For example, for those aged 55-59, around 46.5 per cent of the discouraged job seekers felt that age was the main reason they could not find work, while a further 31 per cent mentioned that there were no jobs in their locality or line of work."

There are many articles that support the viewpoint of ageism

http://www.abc.net.au/news/2017-05-19/age-discrimination-over-50s-worst-bracket-to-be-unemployed/8540548

http://www.smh.com.au/comment/time-to-rectify-costly-age-discrimination-in-the-workforce-20160301-gn73jq.html

However, ageism disappears within the bigger scheme of things.

http://thenewdaily.com.au/money/finance-news/2017/08/16/stephen-koukoulas-unemployment/

https://www.theguardian.com/business/grogonomics/2016/aug/22/why-unemployment-is-no-longer-the-best-indicator-of-the-economys-health

One last thought. The small businesses make up >90% of all businesses and 80% don't employ people. That means they are either contractors or consultants which becomes a different debate.

 

So what to do for those already in Australia. I believe that your mental preparedness in that it will be tougher to get your next job and planning. This includes a career pivot. Do the latter while you in a job as its difficult when you unemployed to attempt that.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

@ottg  When I am in my 80s I am going to be packing boxes at amazon!  They even have a cool name, "camperforce" !

 

https://www.wired.com/story/meet-camperforce-amazons-nomadic-retiree-army/

 

The moneysmart site doesn't fill me with confidence about my care free retirement. 

https://www.moneysmart.gov.au/superannuation-and-retirement/how-super-works/super-contributions/how-much-is-enough

Link to post
Share on other sites

That Wired article is a great story @monsta 

 

Well worth the read

Link to post
Share on other sites

hmmm.........its a great plan B. Difficult to pick shelves with an A-frame or walking stick :lol:

I'll better start working on plan A?

Link to post
Share on other sites
SimpleSimon

It’s a lot easier to get a job as a contractor/consultant than permanent employee.

 

In South Africa I went through lifting of sanctions and mass layoffs due to that as we discovered our manufacturing plants weren’t competitive against imports.

 

In Australia in corporate roles I saw layoffs due to productivity improvements recommended by newly minted MBA consultants.

 

I’ve seen people in their 50’s pushed into premature retirement.

 

I started to feel very vulnerable so I jumped off the corporate track in my early 40’s and now we service a number of corporations rather than just work for one. If one goes down that’s only 5% of our income.

 

There are over 1 million micro businesses in Australia. Set up your own is my recommendation.

Edited by SimpleSimon
  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 5 months later...
RedPanda
On 03/10/2017 at 7:04 AM, SimpleSimon said:

I don’t think it’s about age, it’s about attitude. However, the younger you are, the less likely you are to be set in your ways when you come over.

 

Both my brothers talk about “Africa is in your blood” and go back reasonably regularly almost on an annual basis. One was in his 30s and the other in his 50s when they came over. Both reminisce constantly about the life in South Africa.

 

My family calls Sydney home and we’ve taken on everything Australia has to offer. We’ve been back 3 times - a year after we left because in those days you could only take out tourist allowance, 2004 when my father-in-law died, and finally earlier this year to show our son his heritage.

 

I believe we’ve had a much happier time than my brothers’ families.


I'm a very strong supporter of: If you don't want to migrate, don't. Come over with your whole heart, or stay where you are. But don't come over reluctantly and then complain constantly that you don't really want to be here. Ag nee man, regtig!!!

I do sell the strong/appealing points of Australia to friends and family, because I genuinely believe there's a much better chance here. But if they don't want to leave South Africa, that's their choice.

But yes, if you want to migrate, ASAP is best.

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

It is like you said you need to overcome that decision of are you going or just stay where you are.

That decision took me about six months.

Writing my IELTS next week.

 

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

×
×
  • Create New...